Fast-food chains agree to end 'no-poaching' policies that critics say limit job opportunities

Get the Full StoryJonathan Weiss Shutterstock.comSEATTLE AP — Seven national fast-food chains have agreed to end policies that block workers from changing branches — limiting their wages and job opportunities — under the threat of legal action from the state of Washington.

Washington Attorney General Bob Ferguson announced binding agreements with the companies — McDonald's, Auntie Anne's, Arby's, Carl's Jr., Jimmy John's, Cinnabon and Buffalo Wild Wings — at a news conference Thursday. McDonald's had previously announced plans to end the practice.

The so-called no-poach policies prevent franchises from hiring workers away from other franchises of the same chain. That's been considered convenient for franchise owners, but has blocked experienced workers at one franchise from getting better-paying jobs at others, potentially keeping tens of thousands of employees around the country stuck in low-wage positions.See the rest of the story at Business InsiderSee Also:TripAdvisor just named this the best burger joint in America. Here's what it's like to eat there.13 popular fast-food menu items that are surprisingly perfect for vegansPapa John's founder has left the company after admitting to saying the N-word on a conference call. Here's a look into his history of controversy, from slamming Obamacare to donating to Trump's campaign.

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